Panasonic VIERA VT50A 3D plasma TV

Panasonic Viera VT50A Panasonic sells the VT50A as a 55in and 65in model, although overseas markets also get a 50in panel. There is some overlap here between the VT50A and ST50A, which comes in 50in, 60in and 65in sizes. For price comparisons, we’ll directly compare the $5999 65in VT50A to the $3999 ST50A. We have heard rumours that Panasonic has run out of stock of the 50in ST50A and is discontinuing the range next month — stay tuned for more news soon. Review: Panasonic VIERA ST50A 3D plasma TV Panasonic VIERA VT50A: Design and setup The VIERA VT50A, like the VT30A before it, is the most attractive and modern-looking plasma TV in Panasonic’s range. It’s got a borderless design with no bulky plastic bezel; a single sheet of glass runs across the entire face, with a thin strip of metal running around the edge for contrast. The plasma display stops around an inch from the edge of the VT50A’s chassis — this is no edge-hugging Samsung Series 8 or LG LM9600 — but the overall design looks sleek, and the black borders help to boost screen contrast. The stand of the VIERA VT50A doesn’t swivel, so the best option for using this TV in a big room is wall-mounting it on a tilt/swivel mount. A maximum depth of 50mm means the VT50A is thin enough to be attractive, but not as thin as a LED TV. The Panasonic VT50A leads the field in connection options. Four HDMI ports (a step up from the ST50A’s three) are our go-to inputs, as well as the three USB 2.0 connectors and a...

Panasonic TX-L42E5B LED LCD TV U.K Review

Panasonic TX-L42E5B LED TV The subject of today’s review is the Panasonic TX-L42E5B 2D-only LED LCD TV, an entry-level product geared towards the budget-conscious within the company’s 2012 lineup of HDTVs, although its price is probably closer to the lower spectrum of midrange models. So with that in mind, let’s see how this flat-screen television stacks up against (high-tier) low-end and (low-tier) midrange offerings from competing brands. Note:While we did not test the smaller, 32-inch Panasonic TX-L32E5B, there shouldn’t be any drastic difference in picture performance considering that all models within the Viera E5 range share similar specifications. Design Design-wise the TX-L42E5 doesn’t do anything special to stand out from the crowd. The glass border resembles previous Samsung LCD TVs, as does the piano finish. Enclosed in glossy plastic shell, the base lacks swivel functionality. The overall presentation is very fitting to its price tag.   Assembly of the table-tap stand is quite straightforward, owing to the two-step method. The on-screen welcome guide is very efficient and simple to follow. Connections Like most slim LED TVs, all HDMI ports on the TX-L42E5B are side-mounted, but there’s enough spacing for the cables not to be seen. Both component and RGB SCART connections require the supplied proprietary adapters. 4X HDMI 1X Component and Composite (via adapter) 1X RGB SCART (via adapter) 1X Headphone 1X SD Slot 2X USB 2.0 1X Audio Input 1X Optical Out 1X Ethernet 1X VGA Input Graphical User Interface (GUI) The Panasonic TX-L42E5 features the same GUI found on last year’s Viera LED LCD televisions. Navigating through various layers of the menu is effortless to say the...

Panasonic VIERA TC-P55GT50 3D Plasma TV

Panasonic Plasma TV – Viera TCP55GT50 Planet LED TV Ed – we normally stick to LED TV sets, but we really liked this Panasonic Plasma TV review, so we have reproduced it here. Certainly the image on Plasma is excellent, bright, vivid and colorful and the 3D images tend to be nice and crisp. Whislt we still favor LED TV, Plasma has definitely ironed out many of the inherent problems, so here courtesy of Goodgearguide – the Viera ST50A reviewed for your pleasure :>) Panasonic has begun a swing away from its mainstay plasmas towards thinner, more power-friendly LED TVs in 2012, although its top television is still a plasma — but the range-topping VT50A is at least $3799 for the 55-inch, and a painful $5999 for the 65-inch model. (prices have dropped since this report was written – Planet LED TV Ed) Enter the VIERA ST50A: it’s one step down from the VT50A in Panasonic’s plasma hierarchy, but comes with a massive reduction in price. The 50-inch model we’re testing here is a mere $1749 RRP, while the 55-inch and 65-inch variants are $2799 and $3999 — cheap by comparison. We’ve even seen the 50-inch model for less than $1300 at some online retailers. Panasonic VIERA ST50A: Design The VIERA ST50A isn’t especially thin (or especially attractive) when you compare it to LED TVs like the LG LM9600 or Samsung Series 8, but it’s not bad for a plasma. At around 45mm thick, with a 35mm bezel, it’s much more svelte than the plasmas of yesteryear, although the new Samsung Series 8 plasma is more attractive and thinner....

Panasonic TX-L47WT50 review

Pansonic Smart Viera 47 Inch – TX-L47WT50 Panasonic may be a long-time champion of plasma, but now it’s flying the LED flag with equal gusto. The Panasonic TX-L47WT50 sits at the top of its range – you can buy 42- and 55in models as well as this 47in version. See all TV reviews. A smart looker, it packs serious picture-enhancing silicon, including a dual-core processor; the benefit of which is most evident when using the brand’s Viera Connect internet portal, home to the likes of iPlayer, YouTube, Dailymotion, Netflix and Fetch TV. The extra processing grunt allows multiple streaming services to stay live; the main screen image graphically peeling back to provide a fast track to your IPTV. Visit Sony BRAVIA KDL-55HX853 3D LED TV review. Both Freeview HD and Freesat HD tuners are built in. The latter is helpful should you have a spare Sky dish feed available, and limited terrestrial reception. The screen is built around an IPS Alpha panel, which theoretically means less colour and contrast loss when viewed from the side. Go to Group test: What’s the best TV? The TX-L47WT50 has four HDMIs, Scart, component, PC VGA, an SD card slot and optical digital audio. You also get built-in Wi-Fi. There are three USB ports with the option to timeshift direct from the EPG to an external hard drive. While the user interface is slick, with an engaging use of animated graphics, the Freeview EPG is extremely basic, with no thumbnail image of what you’re currently watching, nor ongoing audio.??Picture quality is excellent. The WT50’s Neo Black LED panel delivers convincing blacks, subtle gradations and...

Panasonic TC-P55VT30, One Of The Best 3D TV Money Can Buy …

Panasonic Viera 3D TV – TC-P55VT30 Television makers have always endeavored to make real life images appear on their TV screens for viewers to enjoy their effects in the cozy warmth of their own homes. This would ensure viewers need not always have to go to the nearest theaters for enjoying such an experience where privacy is usually the last thing they can expect to have. A perfect 3D TV set to complement an enriching home theater system can be the right solution. One TV set that has taken large strides in this direction is the Panasonic TC-P55VT30 3D TV. This is a HD capable 3D TV which has also won the Gold in the Top Ten Review award. One has to consider quite a few issues though prior to putting in the big money into a 3D TV for this as a product is nothing compared to a house or a car, the other assets that people do put in large amount of money. Panasonic however, in its TV products has done lots of technological advances and their vibrant colors speaks a lot of the standard. The Panasonic 3D TV is based on active technology where one has to wear glasses that are quite costly when compared to the ones used for passive TV sets. There is however the instant 3D effect that one gets while using the 3D viewing glasses which are required for active based 3D sets. The passive glasses does have different viewing effects on different individuals and at times have led to nauseous feeling amongst viewers. The active shutter viewing glasses have mechanism on...

Panasonic Viera TH-L47DT50 (47-inch LED)

Panasonic Viera 47 Inch LED TV The Viera DT50 series is the second-tier 3D LED TV range from Panasonic. They’re superseded only by the flagship WT50, yet offer a similar ultra-thin bezel design at lower prices. Some of the new functions include a Web browser, onboard Wi-Fi and backlight for its remote control. Performance-wise, this 47-incher is a solid 3D performer and delivered relatively smooth and crisp visuals. However, some movie buffs might find the panel’s unusually bluish colors unnatural and its grayish blacks less than satisfactory. Here’s our assessment of the 47-inch TH-L47WT50. Design An illuminated Panasonic logo etched on a translucent paneling. (Credit: Philip Wong/CNET Asia) The WT50 may feature a flashier crescent stand, but the TH-L47DT50 is just as attractive with a 11mm-thin bezel in silver-brushed-metal finish. There’s also an illuminated Panasonic logo that’s etched on a translucent surface (refer to the above image). While we had no difficulty using the lightly recessed side A/V inputs, the TV buttons on the rear are harder to reach. Onscreen labels can be activated to mitigate the less-than-ideal placement. This 3D eyewear is light and fits comfortably over prescription glasses. (Credit: Philip Wong/CNET Asia) At just 30g, the latest Panasonic 3D goggles (model TY-ER3D4MA) are one of the lightest active shutter models in the market. They fit comfortably over most prescription glasses and sport a full wrap-around frame to block ambient light. Two adjustable rubberized nose pads and curvy legs also provide a closer fit. It would have been more convenient if the battery compartment’s cover is not secured by a screw, though.. Panasonic has finally introduced backlighting for...

Panasonic TX-L47E5B UK Review

Panasonic E5B LED TV Range If you’re not fussed about 3D then the TVs in Panasonic’s E5B range might be more up your street than some of the company’s pricier models. They are the cheapest in Panasonic’s line-up of LED sets as they use a modest 50Hz panel and don’t support 3D.Here I’m reviewing the largest set in the range, the 47-inch Viera Panasonic TX-L47E5B, which can be bought from less than £800 online.   User interface and EPG   One area where Panasonic was slipping behind the competition last year was in the look and feel of its menu system. This trend looks set to continue for another year at least. Despite this being a brand new model, the menu has barely changed since Panasonic’s 2011 TVs.There have been a few tweaks here and there, including a more welcoming set-up menu that greets you when you first turn on the TV. It guides you through the process of tuning in channels, setting up the network connection and downloading and installing any firmware updates that are available.However, for the most part, the menus remain quite flat and boring, lacking the graphical niceties that are now the norm for even low-end models in Samsung and LG’sline-ups. You’re still given plenty of control over this TV’s various features though, and if you turn on the Advance (Calibration) mode, you’re given more colour tweaking options in the picture menu.   The electronic programme guide (EPG) has also been tweaked slightly. Thankfully, the web-style adverts that used to take up space on last year’s models have been banished to the annals of history,...

Panasonic TX-P42ST50B review

Panasonic Viera Plasma TV 42 Inch The Panasonic TX-P42ST50B plasma TV havsearned an enviable reputation for picture quality, and its latest models claim to improve things even further, upping the brightness while simultaneously improving black levels.The Viera TX-P42ST50B is my first chance to check out whether this is true. Priced at around £950 online, this TV sits below the VT50 and GT50 models in Panasonic’s line-up of 3D plasma sets, and above the entry-level UT50. User interface and EPG   The menu system that Panasonic uses on its TVs badly needs to be updated to bring it into line with more modern offerings from the likes of Sony, LG and Samsung. The bad news is that Panasonic has told me this isn’t going to happen until its next generation of TVs.There are some updates on last year’s models but they’re mere tweaks. The menus remain dull and dated. Most simply consist of white or yellow text against a blue background, with minimal use of graphics.At least the electronic programme guide (EPG) has finally been overhauled to remove the web-style adverts that used to clog up the screen. If you pop into the set-up menu, you can now also choose between three layouts for the EPG.The ‘Normal’ mode shows seven channels’ worth of data at a time, the ‘Full’ option displays 10, while ‘Info’ has five channels, but adds a programme description box at the bottom of the screen. While this is welcome, it’s still annoying that you lose all sound and video when you use the EPG, as there’s no video thumbnail window.   Digital media and Internet features...

Panasonic TX-P42S30 review

Panasonic Viera 42 Panasonic has been pushing 3D on its Viera plasma range this year, but it does still offer a few 2D-only models such as the Panasonic TX-P42S30.This display uses last year’s plasma technology rather than the latest tech found in its ST30, GT30 and VT30 siblings.However, this also means it’s much more affordable. It can be bought for around £450online.   User interface and EPG This may be a budget set but it uses the exact same menu system as Panasonic’s higher-end TVs. This isn’t necessarily a good thing as the user interface that Panasonic employs on this year’s screens is some way behind what competitors are offering on their latest TVs. It’s certainly not as slick or as sophisticated-looking as Samsung, LG and Sony’s TVs. The main menu shows four tabs down the left-hand side of the screen for picture, sound, timer and set-up options. A small graphic is used to depict each one. When you actually enter the menu you’ll find that they only really consisted of white text set against a blue background, so the presentation is quite dated. This TV lacks the calibration tools of Panasonic’s higher-end models, so picture tweaking options are a little limited. However, they’re still likely to be more than acceptable for the average user. There are slider bars to set the contrast, brightness, colour and sharpness settings. The advanced menu allows you to select between off, mid and max settings for both the Intelligent Frame Creation modes and the upscaler — or Resolution Enhancer, as Panasonic calls it. Unfortunately, the electronic programme guide (EPG) for the Freeview HD...

Panasonic PT-AE7000 home theatre projector

The Panasonic PT-AE7000 is a home theatre projector with a bright, efficient 2000 lumen lamp and a 3D-capable 1080p Full HD LCD panel, with a rated contrast ratio of 3,000,000:1. These specifications sound impressive, and that’s because they are: the AE7000 is an excellent performer.   Campbell Simpson Good Gear Guide 21/03/12 Follow @pcworldau Bottom Line Panasonic’s AE7000 projector is one of the first 3D LCD projectors available to home cinema enthusiasts. It’s an excellent 2D projector, and definitely one of the best we have seen for watching 1080p Full HD movies. If you want to watch 3D video it’s not as good due to a significant dip in brightness, but it’s still usable in a darkened room. Panasonic PT-AE7000: Design and setup The big, black Panasonic PT-AE7000 looks simple and utilitarian from the front and from the top — and these are the angles you’ll be looking at if you mount the AE7000 on your home theatre room’s ceiling. The 2x zoom lens is offset to the right of the projector, and there are fan exhaust and intake vents on the front and right side. Three labeled LED lights on the top of the projector display power and warnings for overheating or lamp failure. Apart from a Panasonic logo and Full HD 3D badge, there’s nothing else to see. Move around to the projector’s right, and you find a control pad with power button, menu button and navigational pad, and electronic zoom and focus controls for the lens. As you zoom the lens to suit larger projection surfaces there is a reasonable amount of light fall-off, but we...