Sony Bravia 3D LED TV

Sony Bravia 3D LED TV What sets Sony Bravia 3D and LED TV sets apart from the crowd. Well certainly they are known to be some of the most technically advanced TV sets around, but what have Sony got to say for themelves on this issue? Our friends in Vancouver had a chat with a Sony Canada representative to see what they had to say – this is what they found out! Well, first of all it’s in full high definition, 1080p (the most detailed) high def these days and it’s also like stereo for your eyes, with one image for each eye to give the full 3D experience. This is achieved by using what Sony call the “projector method” where they produce two distinct images, one for each eye. They then shift the frames so that every sixteenth of a second a different image is presented to each eye – left and right, alternating images. That’s the basis of how Sony create 3D. In effect it is an illusion that tricks your brain via your eyes. But what about that age old chestnut of crosstalk – the blurring of the 3D image? Certainly this can and does happen on many 3D TV sets. Crosstalk is in actual fact the images for the left and right eyes getting a little bit “mixed up”. The timing of the image delivery goes awry and the left eye sees a little of the right eye image and vice versa. This causes a ghost or blur (mainly to the periphery of vision) that has come to be known as crosstalk. Sony say that...

New and Improved Google TV to Launch in UK in July on Sony Set-Top Box

Google TV It’s official. Google TV is coming to the UK in the form of a £200 set-top box developed by Sonyand landing sometime next month in July. Planet TV Ed: Launch date is now set for 23rd July 2012 First Google TV Flopped Google TV, a product from the search engine titans which merges television viewing with online capabilities and apps, was first launched all the way back in 2010 with the Logitech Revue set-top box. However, consumer reaction was anything but positive. In fact, people complained of a buggy, poorly designed OS, with limited apps and a high price. For Logitech, the experience was a disaster, with the Google set-top box losing the company $100 million. Two years later, though, Google has since made many changes to this service and now the improved Google TV is coming to Britain on board the Sony NSZ-GS7 set-top box. Photo: Sony Redesigned User Interface So just what’s better with Google TV this time around, one might ask? Well, for starters, the entire user interface and OS has been redesigned, for the better. Your favourite TV channels, apps like YouTube, the Chrome browser for online activities and so on are now accessible directly from the home screen – much like with a smartphone. Also like on a smartphone, Google TV users will have many more apps to choose from than before. Uses Android Based OS Actually, the new Google TV OS is based on Android and, as a result, it can run Android apps, although these must first be optimised for use with TV screen sizes. Therefore, we can definitely expect...

LED TV comparison: Sony HX850 vs LG LM9600

LED TV Comparison Two of the top TVs released this year are Sony’s BRAVIA HX850 and LG’s LM9600. Both are LED TVs with cutting-edge designs, excellent picture quality and almost identical specifications. We’re comparing the two to see which comes out on top. Read the full review of the Sony BRAVIA HX850 here. Read the full review of the LG LM9600 here. Read Sony’s product page for the BRAVIA HX850 here. Read LG’s product page for the LM9600 here. Sony HX850 vs LG LM9600: Design While both TVs look modern and stylish, they are distinct from each other. Whichever you prefer is mostly down to personal taste, and your own opinion of which will better suit your decor. Here’s what the Sony BRAVIA HX850 looks like: And here’s what the LG LM9600 looks like: It’s a close call. Personally, we think the LG LM9600 has the edge, but it’s a slight one. The big difference between the two TVs is in the bezel: where the Sony has a bezel of around an inch around the TV’s LCD panel, the LG’s panel extends to within about five millimetres of the chromed edge. Apart from a thin bezel running along the lower edge, the TV is largely borderless and the effect is impressive. The Sony has a superior stand, though, and the option for a larger stand with more powerful integrated speakers and a six-degree backwards tilt. Sony HX850 vs LG LM9600: Connectivity The two TVs are almost identical when it comes to connectivity options. Both TVs have four HDMI 1.4 ports including one with Audio Return Channel (ARC). Both have...

Sony KDL-55HX853 55in 3D LED TV

The Sony 55inch KDL-HX853 is currently the highest ranked of Sony’s 2012 TVs. It heads up a new Spartan range from the brand intended to rebuild its TV fortunes. Interestingly, it doesn’t come laden with features seemingly pulled at random from a brainstorming session down the local Karaoke; which means it’s not competing directly with Samsung’s massively-pimped ES8000 models, and as a consequence it’s considerably cheaper, at around £1,800. It is, however, comparable on style and packs Hubble-grade image enhancement.   55in flagship: Sony’s Bravia KDL-55HX853 Smart connectivity is the key feature on this set. Sony has long offered a wide selection of streaming video services, via an interface the kind might describe as cumbersome. But the HX853 heralds a new look for the rechristened Sony Entertainment Network, with apps, IPTV and music now navigated via a slick-looking Metro-style UI. It’s here that you’ll find the latest iteration of BBC iPlayer, plus YouTube, Demand 5, LoveFilm, Netflix, Crackle, Skype, Mubi and Muzi, amongst others. The brand has also joined the apps race, having inked a deal with Opera to supply causal games and sundry trivia via the integrated Opera TV Store.   Sony Entertainment Network portal Network media compliancy is unchanged from the brand’s 2011 TVs. There’s no support for MKV from either USB or NAS across a LAN, but AVI, MOV, MP4 files play. Audio covers MP3 (with album art), AAC, WMA and WAV. To ease playback problems, Sony offers a DLNA application for PC and Mac called Homestream, which performs on-the-fly file conversion for connected devices when required. The catch, of course, is that you’ll always need...

Sony Bravia KDL-26EX553

  Sony Bravia LED TV 26 Inch After trying and testing the various options in the internal menu, for watching films, we found the best settings were ‘Custom’ mode with colour temperature at ‘Warm 1’ and ‘Gamma’ at -1. With these settings, you can enjoy relatively accurate (if not perfect) colours (the average Delta E is just under 3.4), above-average contrast (2900:1), a well-balanced gamma and a near-perfect colour temperature. For standard definition sources (DVD, SD TV channels, etc.), the image can look a little soft, but boosting the sharpness setting corrects this. Plus, if you have one of the latest generation games consoles, it’ll do a much better job of of DVD upscaling than this TV. Our Readings: How We Test TVs Sony is replacing 2011’s EX320 with a new small-sized Edge LED TV—the EX553 (EX550 in mainland Europe), available with a 22-inch or 26-inch screen. This small, occasional TV is a handy second telly for a kitchen or bedroom, and comes with Wi-Fi connectivity, Sony’s Internet TV services for access to TV and movies on demand, as well as all kinds of apps in the Sony Entertainment Network. Design   In design terms, the EX553 is basically a small version of the HX753. The screen can now be tilted 6° backwards and is mounted on a new stand consisting of two slim metal feet. The only difference between this model and the HX753 is that the stand doesn’t swivel.   Anyone who’s tired of black electronics will be pleased to hear that Sony will be selling the EX553 in both black and white.   Like other Sony...

Sony Bravia KDL-32BX330 Review

Sony Bravia 32 Inch LED TV Sony’s bare-bones 32-inch LCD TV brings Sony’s signature picture quality and price premium to go with it. Let’s be honest: You may have spent weeks or even months researching the perfect TV for your living room, den or home theater, but when it comes to outfitting your small bedroom, kitchen, dorm or play-room with a TV, you are far more likely to make an impulse purchase. You might be shopping for shoes or a lawn mower, but chances are that if you happen to run across a 32-inch TV selling at a price that seems too good to be true, you’ll scoop it right up without a second thought. With that said, we also know that people do have some standards. The woo of the “flat-screen TV” is over. They’re all flat-screens now. So, eventually, we’re all going to come back to caring about picture quality, no matter the size. That’s where the Sony BX330 is meant to come in. At around $330, it isn’t the least expensive 32-inch TV you can find by a long shot. But, it’s got the Sony name on it and, historically speaking, that means a higher quality TV. The question is: Does Sony come through with enough of its legendary quality to make the BX330 worth the extra scratch? In our Sony BX330 review, we aim to answer that very question. Read on to find out how this budget-level TV fared in our evaluations. Out of the box The first thing we noticed about the Sony BX330 as we pulled it from its box was its feather-light...

Sony BRAVIA KDL-55HX853 3D LED TV review

Sony Bravia HX850 LED TV Range The Sony BRAVIA HX850 is the newest model in Sony’s 2012 TV line-up, and is the second most expensive TV on offer. It’s got a slightly higher price than the comparable Samsung ES7500 and LG LM8600. It has excellent picture quality in both preset and calibrated modes, but the Sony interface is beginning to look dated. See also Group test: what’s the best TV?   Sony BRAVIA HX850: Design The HX850 is the top new release for Sony this year, but it still sits under the HX925 — a 2011 release that the company is keeping on until 2013. Visit Samsung PS50C6900 Like the HX925 the BRAVIA HX850 is a ‘Monolithic Design’ Sony TV, with no visible bezels or disruptive design cues. We tested the HX850 with its optional stand, which includes more powerful speakers and a six-degree backwards tilt, but the bundled stand is also attractive and fits in with the TV’s sleek and futuristic design. The HX850 isn’t nearly as glossy as the earlier HX925, and that’s a very good thing. We used the HX850 in a room brightly lit by fluorescent lights and while it is moderately reflective, distractions can be minimised with careful room placement. The optional stand is more likely to reflect ceiling lights due to its rakish cant. We wouldn’t use the HX850 in a room where a large light source like a window is directly in front of the TV — a matte screen (like a Sharp or some Panasonics) is a better choice here. The screen is finished in a single sheet of Gorilla Glass,...

Sony BRAVIA KDL-46HX850 3D LED TV

 Sony Bravia 46 Inch 3D LED TV  Sony BRAVIA HX850: Design The HX850 is the top new release for Sony this year, but it still sits under the HX925 — a 2011 release that the company is keeping on until 2013. Like the HX925 the BRAVIA HX850 is a ‘Monolithic Design’ Sony TV, with no visible bezels or disruptive design cues. We tested the HX850 with its optional stand, which includes more powerful speakers and a six-degree backwards tilt, but the bundled stand is also attractive and fits in with the TV’s sleek and futuristic design. Gorilla Glass – Really The HX850 isn’t nearly as glossy as the earlier HX925, and that’s a very good thing. We used the HX850 in a room brightly lit by fluorescent lights and while it is moderately reflective, distractions can be minimised with careful room placement. The optional stand is more likely to reflect ceiling lights due to its rakish cant. We wouldn’t use the HX850 in a room where a large light source like a window is directly in front of the TV — a matte screen (like a Sharp or some Panasonics) is a better choice here. The screen is finished in a single sheet of Gorilla Glass, but the bezel of the Sony BRAVIA HX850 does intrude around an inch from the TV’s edge on all sides. When it’s switched on, the HX850 doesn’t have the same impressive borderless effect that we liked on the LG LM9600. The deep black bezel does make the on-screen image look more contrasty and impressive, though. Interface and Apps The remote control that’s bundled...

Sony Bravia KDL-46EX523 46-Inch LED TV

Sony Bravia 46 Inch LED TV – KDL46EX523 The 46-inch Sony Bravia KDL-46EX523 doesn’t stand out from the HDTV pack in design, features, or picture quality, but once you look at its price and its range of connected features, it starts to get a little more interesting. Priced at $990 (as of March 28, 2012), this set has a lot of features that a budget buyer might want, including an edge-lit LED display, full HD support, built-in Internet apps, and Wi-Fi capabilities that make it a good option for people who enjoy Netflix streaming. The major trade-offs include a lack of 3D, a slower-than-most 60Hz refresh rate, and good–but not great–picture quality. Lab Tests: Picture and Sound Quality In PCWorld’s subjective tests, the Bravia KDL-46EX523 turned in decent scores across the board. Our panel of five reviewers gave it solid scores of Average, noting that colors occasionally looked a little muted and that the set had some motion issues, especially in test scenes containing a lot of panning or fine detail. Colors on the KDL-46EX523 always seemed to be just slightly off in our tests. In our 720p NASCAR clip, which is designed to test fast-motion handling from an over-the-air broadcast, multiple judges noted that colors appeared muted and a little washed out next to other sets in our test pool. In our 1080i football clip, the field’s green grass seemed a bit too artificial, and the overall scene was noticeably less bright than it was on the other HDTVs in our test batch. The KDL-46EX523’s motion issues were most prominent in our horizontal-panning test, which is designed to...

Sony Bravia Sharpens Web-Video Streams For Big TV Screens

Sony Bravia – Better Web Stream Images Want to dump the $75-a-month cable or satellite-TV service? There are plenty of options to help satisfy that TV fix, and they continue to improve as more consumers cut the cord and turn to the Internet for video content. A report released this year by market research firm Nielsen found that homes with broadband and no traditional pay-TV service — a base that increased by 23 percent from late 2010 to late 2011 — stream video twice as much as the rest of the population. One way to view Internet content on the TV is to hook up the set with a streaming player or a video gaming console such as an Xbox 360. The past couple of years have given rise to smart TVs, which can connect to a Wi-Fi network without the need for an external peripheral. And in 2011, Sony introduced technology that helps improve the quality of Web content designed for smaller screens when they’re streamed to the big screen. For the past couple of weeks, I tested a 46-inch Sony smart TV — the Bravia HX820 — that features the X-Reality Pro video processing technology. Sony says X-Reality Pro can improve the quality of all content from Blu-ray movies to low-resolution, highly compressed Web video. For my test, I focused on streaming video from Netflix and user-generated clips on YouTube. The Netflix videos appear crisper when compared with the same stream to my 5-year-old 42-inch HD LCD via a PlayStation 3. In addition to the X-Reality Pro technology, refresh rates and other factors may also play a...