Thieves Arrested in Attempt to Steal LG and Samsung OLED TV Tech – About

In what appears to be a classic case of industrial espionage gone wrong, several employees of an Israeli industrial equipment inspection firm have been arrested in Korea for stealing OLED TV technology secrets from both LG and Samsung. Apparently the goal was to steal the technology and relay it to several Taiwanese and Chinese TV manufacturers in an attempt to capitalize on LG and Samsung’s RD work, thus saving the companies receiving the information a lot of money in upfront investment costs that would normally be needed for a new technology. The bottom line: the companies receiving the stolen technology would have the means to undercut both LG and Samsung by possibly flooding the market with more affordable OLED TVs – great for consumers on the short term, but would be a big blow to both LG and Samsung, who actually spent all the money and time to bring large screen OLED TVs to market. For details on the plot, how it was executed, and additional information regarding the arrests, read the report from the Yonhap News Agency. Follow Me On Twitter and...

Rivals Sony & Panasonic unite to develop affordable OLED TV sets

Joint OLED TV From Sony and Panasonic Japanese rivals Sony and Panasonic are teaming up to build the next generation of affordable televisions. The technology giants plan to jointly develop organic light-emitting diode (OLED) panels and modules – a lower-cost production option – for televisions and other large-screen displays. Sony and Panasonic will exercise each of their OLED core technologies to develop the panels. In a joint statement Monday, the companies announced that they are aiming for mass production by 2013, using Panasonic’s printing-based OLED technologies. Sony and Panasonic have seen big losses recently, and today’s announcement is an effort to play catch up with Samsung, which has taken the lead, according to popular American newspaper USA Today. Samsung OLED TV At CES in January, Samsung unveiled its 55in Super OLED HDTV, shortly after LG did the same. Sony, however, used the trade show to show off crystal LED HDTVs. The new, self-emitting crystal LED technology is similar to OLED in that it doesn’t require a backlight, but the technology is entirely new. The prototype on the show floor used 6 million LEDs mounted on the front of the display, providing a wider colour gamut and faster response times. Panasonic took a hit last April when it laid off 17,000 employees in an effort to cut costs and adapt to the changing market. “In parallel with the joint of the next-generation technologies of the OLED panels and modules, Sony and Panasonic plan to continue to study collaboration in the mass production of OLED panels and modules,” the companies said in a statement. While the TV screens will be developed...

Samsung, LG bet on new display to revive TV sales

OLED TV To Revive TV Industry? South Korean TV manufacturers are making billion-dollar bets on a new display technology that promises an even thinner screen and imagery of eye-popping clarity. It might prove to be a costly last gasp of innovation from an industry finding it harder to excite consumers wowed by smartphones and tablets. Undeterred by a flop in 3-D TV and a failure of Internet-connected TVs to boost sales, Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. are hoping “OLED” technology will keep them ahead. The intensely competitive business has already caused Sony’s TV business to lose money for the past eight years. The arrival of flat-screen televisions 15 years ago was an advance in TV technology that tantalized consumers nearly as much as color televisions in the late 1960s. The first generation of flat screens now look obese next to the most recent ultra-thin TVs. Picture quality has also made giant strides. But for most consumers, such incremental changes matter less and less. Why pay for great picture clarity when good quality will do? And why pay more for a TV when smartphones and tablet computers can offer a similar function and much more? When South Korean Lee Sang-hyun decided to get his first television, his priority was to find a reasonably priced TV with a screen big enough to play games. The 30-year-old office worker had a tight budget after splurging on pricey gadgets: an iPhone, an iPad and a laptop computer. To slim down, he picked a 42-inch plasma TV without fancy features. He paid 640,000 won ($550) – less than half of the highest-end...

OLED TV makers set low shipment goals for 2012

OLED TV in 2012 Korean-based Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics have set low shipment goals for OLED TVs in 2012 because of high prices caused by manufacturing challenges and expensive materials, according to industry sources. Samsung has set a goal of 200,000 OLED TV panels from its in-house produciton in 2012, while LG expects to source 50,000 OLED TV panels from LG Display (LGD), down from the previous target of 100,000 units, the sources said. Market researcher IHS iSuppli has estimated that gloabal OLED TV shipments will be approximately 34,000 units this year. Global shipments of the sets are estimated to be limited during the next few years due to the prices remaining dramatically higher than those of LCD TVs, IHS said. A 55-inch OLED TV will be priced at US$8,000 in 2012, according to many industry sources; however, AU Optronics (AUO) president Paul Peng has indicated that the price tag will most likely be as high as US$10,000, which will only appeal to a small market. A US$8-10,000 price tag for 55-inch OLED TVs is more than twice the US$3,700 average expense for an equivalent LCD TV. Samsung’s 55-inch ES9500 will use a series of native red, green, and blue subpixel OLEDs to create a picture, while LG’s 55-inch EM9600 uses white OLEDs (WOLED) overlaid by red, green, and blue filters in addition to a fourth, filter-free white OLED subpixel. Sources added that there will be a lot of promotion of the TVs throughout the Summer Olympics and that sales will most likely begin in South Korea and later in European and North American...

Will OLED Save The TV Industry?

Will OLED TV Save The TV Industry? Analysts are tipping that the new TVs will probably be priced between US$8,999-9,999 in Australia. They will have better image quality, be thinner and more energy efficient than current backlit LED TVs. LG is tipped to be the first followed by Samsung. But will Australians buy this new technology? The “Big Guns” Enter The Market The rumors are that Sony and Panasonic are also looking at launching an OLED TV offering. Sony, who initially said they would “lead the world” in OLED TVs, is now struggling to find a third party manufacturing partner due to a lack of funds. Both Japanese Companies recently reported billion dollar losses and are discussing a possible collaboration on making sets that use new OLED technology, an official at one of the companies said.   The two companies have held preliminary talks on a potential tie-up to make TVs with organic light-emitting diode displays, the official said, declining to be named because the discussions are private. Samsung OLED and LG OLED TV A partnership may be key for the two companies, which reported profit forecasts last week that missed analyst estimates because of losses from selling TVs, as they try to catch up with Samsung  and LG the world’s two biggest TV makers, earn a profit from selling sets while Sony and Panasonic are restructuring by eliminating jobs and seeking partners. “A tie-up would lower their development costs for OLED TVs and enable them to gain ground on the industry-leading South Korean manufacturers,” said Yuji Fujimori, an analyst for Barclays Capital in Tokyo. “Investors could also see this as...

OLED to take 0.02% of TV sales through 2014

OLED Sales Will Be Slow Samsung may be keen to tout OLED as the future of television tech, but it’ll be a good few years yet before sales of organic LED screens come to match plasma and even CRT, let alone LCD. DisplaySearch, a market watcher, this week forecast effectively zero growth for the TV business this year. Shipments of LCD TVs will be up seven per cent, it said, but that increase will be absorbed by an equivalent fall in shipments of CRT and plasma sets.   Source: DisplaySearch DisplaySearch reckons some 250m TVs will ship worldwide in 2012, pretty much the number that shipped in 2011 and, before that, in 2010. OLED has taken and will continue to take a tiny, tiny slice of those sales – 50,000 sets or less, says DisplaySearch – new sets from Samsung and LG for sure, and Apple maybe, notwithstanding. Shipments of 3D TVs is growing, but just as LED backlighting technology is replacing fluorescent backlights in LCD TVs, there seems nothing in DisplaySearch’s numbers to show that 3D adoption is anything more than a product of the way tellies are made these days. Here, most folk would rather have BBC iPlayer on board than 3D. ®...

Good News! OLED TV Prices Will Fall Fast

 OLED TV Prices To Fall Fast A 55-inch OLED TV priced over $8,000 in the second half of 2012 may cost closer to $2,300 within two years, a dramatic price reduction that would make the sets accessible to mainstream buyers. That’s according to a price forecast from research firm NPD DisplaySearch, which predicts a significant and steady decline in OLED TV prices starting soon after the sets debut. Samsung today announced that its 55-inch “Super” OLED 3D TV will be available in Korea for around $9,000 in the second half of 2012. The company didn’t say when its OLED TV will arrive in the U.S. Acknowledging a “great deal of uncertainty” surrounding prices of large OLED TVs, NPD DisplaySearch says the price of a 55-inch OLED model could drop roughly 50 percent to around $4,000 by the end of 2013, and continue falling to the $1,500 range by the end of 2015.   Ultra-thin OLED TVs feature vivid colors, deep blacks, and superior clarity and contrast. Simply put, they display a prettier picture than today’s LCD/LED and plasma TVs. LG Electronics also plans to launch a 55-inch OLED TV with a price tag in the $8,000 range. Maeil Business Newspaper of South Korea reported last month that LG would unveil its OLED set at the Cannes Film Festival in the second half of May. NPD DisplaySearch isn’t alone in predicting a rapid drop in OLED TV prices. Improvements in panel production capacity will quickly reduce manufacturing costs, Digitimes reports, and lower the price gap between OLED and LCD TVs to around 30 percent in 2013. Contact Jeff Bertolucci at...

Struggling Sony Set To Try Selling OLED TVs

Sony OLED TV Sony who three years ago was bragging about their leadership in OLED TV‘s is set to use a third party manufacturer in Taiwan to produce OLED TV’s. The move comes only days after Sony’s new CEO Kazuo Hirai told analysts that he was set to cut back Sony’s exposure to TV’s after eight years of losses. At the 2009 CES Show Sony showed a 19″ OLED Monitor they claimed at the time that they wouldf have full production OLED TV’s within 12 months. [LOCK THE FOLLOWING PART]Sony to Partner on OLED? New reports out of Taiwan claim that Sony is looking to partner with AU Optronics to manufacture Sony OLED TV’s as the loss making Japanese Company tries to develop a turnaround strategy. “We know that Sony will have to form some kind of alliance with a third party since it would be difficult for it to capture more share in the OLED TV area alone. It’s not a surprise if it is considering a tie-up (with AU),” Nobuo Kurahashi, an analyst at Mizuho Investors Securities, told Reuters. “For Taiwan and Japan, their interests coincide. If they don’t do anything, there will always be a gap in market share,” he added, pointing to competition from South Korea. Samsung and LG Set Dates For OLED Launch Both Samsung and LG in January displayed prototype 55-inch OLED (organic light emitting diode) screens – which boast sharper images and do not need backlighting – at the CES consumer electronics show in Las Vegas in January the TV’s will go on sale in Australia in September. Sony, which pioneered the...

What is OLED?

What Is OLED TV? By now you’ve probably heard about OLED or organic light-emitting diodes. LG and Samsung both revealed potential models at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, with the LG winning CNET’s Best of CES Award. Make no mistake, this is the most important advancement in TV technology in over a decade and a vast improvement over both LCD and plasma. Here’s why. How does it work? You only need red, green and blue light to create a TV image. OLEDs work by putting electricity through certain materials that glow these specific colours. No other TV technology creates light directly like this. LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs use colour filters and light-blocking liquid crystals above a light-creating backlight. Plasmas use UV light created by igniting pockets of gas to excite red, green and blue phosphors. What does this mean? Well, OLED TVs will be thinner, lighter, more efficient and better performing than any current television technology. Each pixel can be shut off, for an absolute black — no other tech can do this, except for the now virtually extinct CRT (cathode ray tube). This means an actual infinite contrast ratio, not just marketing hype. For example, LG’s 55-inch OLED unveiled at CES weighs 3.4 kilograms and is about as deep as a pencil (0.78mm). It’s hard not to be excited about OLED, as it ticks all the boxes of a dream television: incredible contrast, impossibly thin, extremely energy efficient. LED vs. OLED As we’ve discussed before, current televisions marketed as “LED TVs” aren’t actually LED TVs. They’re LCD TVs that use LEDs for the backlight. While LED LCDs...