Declining prices make LED TV popular, taking up 37% of market

LED TV Prices Fall PETALING JAYA: Television set purchasing trends have leaned towards those with light-emitting diode (LED) backlit or Internet connectivity features, according to market research company GfK Malaysia. Over the past 12 months, sales of LED TV have grown to constitute 37% of total Malaysian TV market, which valued at US$629mil (RM2.01bil), from 17% previously. GfK said in a statement that the total number of TVs sold in Malaysia increased by 50% in volume and 17% in value over the past 12 months. General manager Jennifer Chan said: “As technology continues to develop, lowering prices have made LED TVs increasingly affordable and this is a key factor driving its escalating sales in the country. A file picture shows a man buying LED TV at an outlet selling electronic appliances.Over the past 12 months, sales of LED TV have grown to constitute 37% of total Malaysian TV market “We are witnessing falling TV prices across the board. For instance, the price of a 42-inch LED TV averaged at US$973 (RM3,112) a year ago but today cost 31% less, at just US$673 (RM2,153),” she added. The take-up rate of web-connected TVs have also been rising steadily in the last 12 months. Almost 215,000 units, or 17%, of all flat-panel TVs sold over the past 12 months can access content on the Internet. The web-connected models available has also increased from around 50 to over 100 from a year ago. GfK Malaysia findings also show that more Malaysian consumers are going for larger TV screens, mostly because of declining prices. TVs with screens of 40 inches and above now make...

LG to launch 4K OLED TV in 2013

LG OLED TV Price Point LG has reached a significant milestone in its TV business with the launch of the 55EM9600. With this large-screen Organic LED (OLED) panel, the chaebol now has an early head start in the potentially lucrative OLED TV segment. With a 4mm-thin chassis, the 55EM9600 is currently the slimmest large-screen OLED TV. (Credit: LG) The 55EM9600 features a newly developed White OLED (WOLED) technology, which uses white together with standard red, green and blue (RGB) primary colors. According to LG, WOLED panels have the following key advantages compared with their RGB OLED counterparts.   Stronger color reproduction More competitive pricing Designed for larger screen sizes   Lee (left), Kwon (center) and Jang (right). (Credit: Philip Wong/CNET Asia) We met up with three LG top executives to find out the company’s strategies and visions for this emerging display technology. The head honchos from LG’s home entertainment company are:   Ki-il Kwon, vice president of Overseas TV Sales and Marketing Kwan-sup Lee, vice president of Marketing Communication Division Moon-ik Jang, head of OLED TV Business Division Q: What are the other advantages of LG OLED TV versus Samsung’s version? The yield rate of production for WOLED panels is usually higher than the RGB type. In 2009, LG was already producing 15-inch OLED TVs based on RGB OLED technology, which Samsung is pursuing at the moment. And that’s why we know the limitations and concluded that WOLED is better for big screens. Q: When is LG launching its OLED TV in Asia and the US? What is the estimated price? Although the TV design has been finalized, we’re...

HDTV Almanac – OLED HDTVs Are Really Coming… Maybe

OLED TV Coming Okay, I have to start by waving the white flag of surrender. As many of you may have noticed, I went “dark” for an extended period last fall while I was working on some major projects. For the past month or so, I’ve been behind but I was struggling to catch up by back-dating my entries. Well, I was in Boston all last week for the Society for Information Display’s annual DisplayWeek conference. Not only did I not manage to catch up on my backlog of entries, I didn’t even post once about the show while I was there. So I’m resetting the clock again. I’m accepting the gap in entries for the past month, and will strive to keep up going forward. It’s not that there’s not enough material to write about, it’s just that I’ve got a lot of demands on my time these days. So bear with me as I try my best to keep up. Which brings us to the topic at hand: OLED TV. Samsung and LG both showed 55″ monsters at CES, but since I didn’t attend, I didn’t see them. I did get to see them last week, up close and personal. And I was certainly impressed. After discussing them with my friend and colleague Ray Soneira of Displaymate, I went back and looked at them even harder. Ray said that they had terrible color shift with off-axis viewing. I have great respect for Ray’s ability to see and identify quality issues in displays, but try as I might, I could not see any hint of color shift on either...

TV Makers Try New Tricks To Restore Market’s Prices

Watch Two Programs on the Same TV At Once! A radical new television set, designed to end the eternal battle for the remote control, was shown in Boston Tuesday. The flat-panel TV, presented at SID Display Week, an industry trade show for electronic screen makers at the Boston Convention Exhibition Center, allows two people wearing special glasses to watch different programs on the same screen. It’s an eye-catching innovation for an industry that badly needs one. The world’s major makers of flat video panels are being hammered by slow sales and a supply glut that has led to huge losses for major screen manufacturers such as South Korea’s Samsung Corp., maker of the dual view TV. “All of the top panel makers have been losing money for at least six quarters,” said Sweta Dash, a senior director at the technology market research firm IHS iSuppli in El Segundo, Calif. ‘All of the top panel makers have been losing money for at least six quarters.’   The problem is price, analysts said. Thanks to a glut of flat TV panels, sets that once cost thousands of dollars now sell for hundreds. That may be good for consumers, but it’s disastrous for giant panel makers like Samsung, South Korean rival LG Electronics, and Japan’s Sharp Corp. As TV viewers switched from obsolete picture-tube TVs to flat panel sets, those companies built huge, highly efficient factories to make millions of panels a year for themselves and other manufacturers. But television sales flattened during the 2008 economic collapse, taking those panel makers by surprise, according to analyst Paul Semenza of NPD DisplaySearch of...

LED TV Guide: What’s the Best LED/LCD HDTV?

Best LED TV We frequently have readers asking, “What’s the best LED TV?” Although we don’t get a chance to review them all, we do see a lot and there are certain features and technologies that can make for a more enjoyable LED TV viewing experience. 2012 is shaping up to be a great year for LED and LCD TV. Smart TV (audio/video streaming and apps) is now making its way into entry-level and midrange sets, 3D TV is also becoming more affordable (for those who care), and companies like Samsung are adding unique new features such as voice and gesture control which give you a whole new way of interacting with your TV.  Here’s an overview of what to look for in an LED TV in 2012 and what features and technologies make the best LED TV. How Smart is Your TV? The term “Smart TV” has become fairly universal to describe the ability for a TV to connect to the internet to access audio, video and apps.  The most popular of these include Netflix video streaming, Pandora Internet Radio and Amazon Video on Demand, but there are many more providers such as VUDU, CinemaNow and HULU Plus.  And although you are probably doing Facebook and Twitter from a smaller device like a tablet or smart phone, several TV makers include these in their suite of Smart TV internet apps as well. The important things to look for if you are interested in Smart TV include built-in wireless (WiFi) connectivity (some TVs are wired-only, requiring a network cable) and the specific apps or streaming providers that you want. ...

LG Display receives recognition for W-OLED technology

LG OLED TV Recognised Executive of OLED Development Group gets bronze medal for technology LG Display’s technology for making large organic light-emitting diode displays has been recognized ahead of Invention Day with one of its executives scheduled to win the bronze medal on Friday. The Korea Invention Promotion Association will give the industrial bronze medal to LG Display’s senior vice president Ahn Byung-chul of the OLED Development Group for coming up with the firm’s proprietary White-OLED technology for 55-inch OLED TV display panels. With plans to introduce the 55-inch OLED TVs in the latter half of this year, LG has been competing with its rival Samsung Electronics to roll out the premium TV sets this year. LG has concentrated on the W-OLED display technology, which is the product of four sub pixels ― white, red, green and blue ― intended to offer better picture quality, more affordable pricing and bigger sizes. Samsung, however, has adopted the RGB-technology for its 55-inch OLED TVs, leaving room for the adoption of a new technology from next year. LG Electronics’ 55-inch OLED TV equipped with LG Display’s panel (LGD) Ahn Byung-chul, senior vice president of the OLED Development Group at LG Display LG Display’s Ahn, who has won multiple awards for his inventions since joining the company in 1984, has registered up to 246 patents involving a number of innovative technologies such as the W-OLED technology. “W-OLED technology is a premium-level display technology that supplements the lack of productiveness of the blue color in the RGB-OLED technology,” said Ahn. According to Ahn, the W-OLED technology enables more precise and smaller pixels compared to...

Unexpected Sony and Panasonic partnership could see the price of OLED TVs …

Sony And Panasonic Partner on OLED TV News that Sony and Panasonic are in early talks to partner on the production of OLED TVs, could signal a faster than expected reduction in price for the new television technology. Desperate times call for desperate measures, as rivals Sony and Panasonic are said to be discussing a possible partnership, to help lower the production costs of OLED televisions. While this would have been unthinkable 10 years ago, both companies have reported heavy financial losses recently, and share prices for the pair have dropped to levels last seen in the late 70s and early 80s. Samsung and LG’s success in the television market hasn’t helped, and for the Japanese firms not to lose even more ground in the burgeoning OLED market — considered by many to be the “next big thing” in TV technology — they’ll need to keep a tight leash on the cost of both development and production. According to reports, the discussions are in the “preliminary stages,” with no decisions made as yet, and there’s even a chance “other potential partners” may be invited to join in. It also shows that talk of Sony leaving the consumer OLED TV market back in January may have been premature. Faster OLED price drop Both Samsung and LG demonstrated huge 55-inch OLED screens during CES, and Samsung has recently followed up by introducing the ES9500, its first production OLED television. LG is likely to be hot on its heels too, with talk of its 55-inch model coming out before summer. Sony was first out of the gate with a small 11-inch OLED...

Is This What The Apple TV Set Will Look Like?

Apple TV A roundup of the latest speculation on Apple TV. A version of this article originally appeared on our US site, Fool.com. We might as well get comfortable with rumors surrounding Apple‘s (NASDAQ: AAPL.US) all but inevitable full-sized TV set, since this speculation is here to stay. The Apple-centric site Cult of Mac has a source that has allegedly laid eyes on a prototype for Apple’s HDTV. The “well-placed” source claims to have seen the specific device that Steve Jobs was referring to when he told biographer Walter Isaacson he had “finally cracked it,” referring to an integrated TV. What will Apple TV look like? The device supposedly physically looks like Apple’s current Thunderbolt or LED Cinema Display monitors, complete with an iSight camera that will be used for FaceTime video calls, except “much larger.” Those monitors feature 27-inch displays, which would be fairly modest for the TV market. Source: Apple; 27-inch Thunderbolt Display. The report also says that Apple’s virtual assistant Siri will make an appearance, which can be used to start a FaceTime call and presumably other functions that weren’t mentioned specifically. Not much else was mentioned in the report, like other specifications, pricing, or time frame. For comparison, here’s the mockup our own Dari FitzGerald put together for me last year, based on what I think should make its way into the new device. While Siri didn’t make it into the new iPad, that was probably because not all iPads can rely on having network connectivity. For a stationary device that sits on your home Wi-Fi network all day, there’s a strong case that Siri...

Japanese Join Hands to Fend Off Korean Rivals in OLED TV Market

Panasonic and Sony Joint Venture on OLED TV Japanese electronics makers have joined hands to take on their Korean rivals in the next-generation TV market. Competition will get tougher between the two dominant forces in the global market that is worth over W140 trillion a year (US$1=1,159). The Nippon Keizai Shimbun reported on Tuesday that Sony and Panasonic, Nos. 3 and 4 in the world TV market, began talks to jointly develop organic light-emitting diode (OLED) TVs. The partnership between the two traditionally staunch rivals in the Japanese market is aimed at catching up with Samsung and LG, the daily analyzed. Featuring a much sharper and brighter display, OLED TVs are expected to replace LCD and LED flat screens within a couple of years. The two Japanese firms are reportedly in talks to mass-produce large OLED TVs at the earliest time through the tie-up. They want to regain their market dominance in the OLED TV sector after having lost ground to Korean companies in the LCD TV sector. Meanwhile, Samsung Electronics recently unveiled the production model of a 55-inch OLED TV. It said it hopes to be mass-producing a line-up of OLED TVs this year. The new products come with various up-to-date features including a “smart dual view” function that allows viewers to watch two channels simultaneously on a single TV set. LG Electronics also hopes to have the upper hand in the market with its 55-inch 3D OLED TV, which met with a good response at the Consumer Electronics Show in the U.S. early this year. Samsung topped the global TV market last year with a 23.6 percent...

Is Plasma TV dead?

Is Plasma TV Dead? PETER PACHAL GLARE: Plasma TVs have fallen out of favour and Panasonic is being hit the hardest. OPINION: This post was originally published on Mashable. Panasonic, one of the last major TV manufacturers to champion plasma TVs, is now probably regretting that decision. The company just posted a US$10 billion loss for the year, and one of its biggest losers is the plasma TV category, where sales fell way short of expectations. Plasma TV sales only hit about 59 per cent of what the company had predicted. Revenue on Panasonic’s balance sheet from plasma sets was US$3.5 billion, down from US$6 billion the year before. Once the hottest kind of TV you could get, the plasma TV has seen tough times in recent years. Many manufacturers (notably, Pioneer) have abandoned the technology, noting a lack of consumer demand. After Panasonic acquired Pioneer’s industry-leading plasma tech in 2009, it began a valiant effort to promote and market the advantages of plasma TV. Looking at the numbers today, it clearly hasn’t worked. The question remains: Why has plasma display technology fallen so far out of favor with TV buyers? A combination of factors in the industry and the consumer market have conspired to shut plasma TVs out of showrooms – and consumer living rooms. “Plasma is a great technology that is suffering,” says Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate, a display-analysis company. “It has some advantages over LCDs but also has some disadvantages as well.” On the plus side, plasmas can create much darker blacks, have excellent viewing angles, more accurate color and no motion blur, Soneira says. However, LCDs are...