LG 55G2 55-inch 3D LED TV Review

LG 55G2 3D LED TV It’s rapidly becoming evident that an HDTV can’t rely on just a high-def screen anymore; it must have enhancements in order to gain attention from the consumer. Among the enhancements now expected are such things as an Internet connection, availability to run “apps,” and display 3D. But to really “enhance” the overall experience, you need to find a way to make the TV “smart.” One way to do that is to bring in a technology that can integrate throughout the set and all that it’s doing. Ergo, the LG LCD 55-inch Cinema 3D Google TV G2 Series is a “Google TV,” in that features and functionality that most are familiar with when online is now integrated as part of the overall operational experience. For those who wonder, the “Google TV” aspect of the LG is actually a software implementation that ties in through the TV and the features that it offers — it’s not a stand-alone box as has been the case in the past. You’ll need to enter/create a Google account in order to use all of the functionality — basically the system tracks what you’re doing and offers suggestions based on what “it” sees going on; this is similar to using Google-based functions online in its simplest sense. But here we have television broadcasts added to the mix. The advantage of the Google experience is that much of what is going on is happening online — as you’re accessing video, photos, looking at stuff that is not just locally based. Google TV is able to do such things as make “searching” more...

LG 3D LED TV – The LG55LM960V

LG 3D LED TV Review – LG55LM960V We found this great new LG 3D TV Review from our friends at Pocket-lint. Here at Planet LED TV we think LG are “on the march” and this review re-inforces that view. LG now provide a viable alternative to the top end brands, enjoy this in depth review of the LG55LM960V… LG’s top-tier LCD TV, the extra large 55-inch version of the LM960V series in this case, has a dual-core processor and passive 3D system to add to its headline Nano LED-backlight technology. But can it cut the mustard when considering the likes of Sony’s latest HX853-series? Design The 55LM960V is a whopper of a TV. The box it was delivered in was huge and cumbersome – a trait that the TV itself avoids, despite its 45kg weight. Like all the best TV designs it’s the 55LM960V’s screen that’s left to dominate. The flat panel is surrounded by a 13mm-deep silver-like bezel that protrudes a mere 3mm over the screen. The bottom banner is a touch more, at 15mm, but it’s still small and barely noticeable when watching the screen. This is one good-looking telly. The two-pronged, fork-like stand is equally subtle and unobtrusive; indeed it carries forth the same elegant finish as the rest of the TV. From the outside there’s not a hint of overdesign here, unlike some other manufacturers. Beyond the main set itself LG has delivered not one but two controllers: there’s the standard remote, but also what the company calls a “magic remote” with voice recognition. The magic remote works like a bit like a Nintendo Wii...

Is this the future of television?? LG launch "ultimate display" OLED TV

OLED TV – The Future of Television? Tech launches don’t come much glitzier than the bash LG had for its new flagship 55″ OLED TV last week. The no-expenses spared event took place in the billionaires playground of Monte Carlo ahead of this year’s Monaco GP with F1 legends Sebastian Vettel and David Coulthard on hand for the occasion, along with film director Jean-Jacques Annaud and model Gemma Sanderson. Despite it being a time of belt-tightening, such grandstanding was both justified (the set is nothing short of stunning), and in many ways necessary. Organic Light Emitting Diode technology represents the next battlefield for TV manufacturers after the bloody wars of plasma and LCD claimed big name casualties such as Pioneer, JVC and Phillips. Like plasma TVs, OLED panels have pixels that are self-illuminating. This has the benefit of eliminating the need for backlighting, something that is required by LED TVs which in turn make them incapable of delivering truly deep blacks. NO Backlight – Slimmer Screen TV Not having a backlight unit also means OLED displays can be much slimmer and lighter than anything currently on the market, while also offering much lower power consumption. Up until this point the only OLED displays that manufacturers have so far released have been squint-inducing 11 and 15 inch affairs, so LG’s unveiling of a wall-filling 55″ screen set is a significant one. The TV itself is nothing short of a game-changer. Just 4mm thick, watching some demo footage of Vancouver at night really showed off the screen’s insanely precise and vibrant  colour range, with a rich level of contrast that wipes...

PREVIEW: LG 55-inch 55EM9600 OLED TV first look

LG 55 Inch OLED TV We’ve been big fans of OLED TV tech at Tech Digest and HDTV UK for many a year since first setting eyes upon a prototype Sony screen at CES a few shows ago. Incremental updates to the tech have wowed us at subsequent trade shows, but high prices for screens no bigger than 15 inches have made OLED televisions a ludicrous luxury for only the most demanding of AV enthusiasts. LG and Samsung First To Market That’s all set to change this year however as LG and Samsung go head-to-head with stonking 55-inch OLED models, due in stores later this year. Tech Digest and HDTV UK were invited this week to LG’s glitzy Monaco launch event for their 55-inch OLED TV offering. Make no mistakes; if you’re in the market for a new TV, this is what your cash should be splashed on. OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) televisions offer some key advantages over LCD or LED screens. Faster refresh rates and wider viewing angles can be paired with deep contrast ratios and lavish colours. As OLED sets don’t use backlights, this can all be achieved with far lower power consumption levels, in bezels almost invisibly thin. LG OLED TV 55 Inch Available Soon! LG’s 55EM9600 OLED TV made its first appearance at the start of the year in January’s CES 2012 show, and while little has changed with the set in the subsequent months, it’s still massively exciting to see. The latest headlining feature of LG’s OLED TV detailed at this week’s launch is its use of WRGB technology. Adding a white sub-pixel...

LG 55in OLED TV Priced At £6400 in UK

LG OLED TV – U.K Pricing Comes in around the expected mark, will be out at Christmas (2012) We’ve been waiting a long time to get a price on LG’s monster OLED TV, and now the wait is over. The price of the 55 inch OLED set was promised to be shaping up to be reasonable by the company when the TV was first revealed back at CES, although reasonable is a relative term when it comes to OLED. Even smaller screens are expensive enough. It was rumoured the TV would probably weigh in at just over the five thousand pound mark, and indeed this has proved to be the case. LG has priced its 4mm thin set – with so little bezel it’s apparently almost like watching a picture hovering in mid-air – at 8,000 Euros (£6,400 to you, sir, or indeed madam). Still way beyond the reach of the average consumer, of course, but it bodes well for a few years down the line, when this sort of TV will hopefully drop into a properly affordable price bracket (when production cranks up). And the all-important arrival date? The LG 55EM9600 was expected later this year, and will in fact land at Christmas, so it couldn’t be much later. And good luck fitting the thing into an Xmas stocking, despite its svelte profile. Samsung also has a rival 55 inch OLED set coming out later in 2012, which will battle it out against LG’s effort. Plus both Sony and Panasonic are looking to team up, and build their own joint OLED effort to keep up with the Korean...

LG 42LM670T 42in LED TV – U.K Review

LG LED TV  42LM670T For this TV review we tested the 42in 42LM670T model in the 670T range, but it’s also available in 47in (47LM670T) and 55in (55LM670T) screen sizes. All models have identical specifications except for their dimensions and power usage. We’re confident that image quality will be practically identical across the range. Television manufacturers often hold back top-end features from their mid-range sets to increase demand for more expensive models. Not so with LG. The 670T has almost every single feature of the more expensive 760T series but costs a lot less. The main difference is that the 670T lacks a dual-core processor and only has 400Hz motion control instead of the 760T’s 800Hz. In practice, this means some of the more advanced image processing algorithms aren’t being used, but you still get plenty of display options to tweak. Bright Vibrant Colours In fact, we were impressed by how close we could match it to the more expensive set by spending a bit of time in the menu. Colours range from subtle to garish if you stick with the presets, but the image wizard helps you calibrate the display to suit your own preference. Noise reduction worked well on standard definition content, but HD video is where it excels. Our test footage looked very sharp and detailed, with only a few minor backlight inconsistencies in darker scenes. Superb 3D Images 3D footage impressed us further, helped by the incredibly vivid colours and refreshing lack of crosstalk. As long as you sit facing the TV straight on, passive 3D has a wow factor that active sets simply can’t match. Although...

LG 47LM960V – U.K Review

LG LED TV 46 Inch – LG47LM960V We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: making a TV really, really skinny is all well and good so long as it doesn’t lead to major compromises in picture quality. After all, for the vast majority of the time you’re looking at a TV’s front, where its pictures are, rather than its rear. So frankly we don’t give a monkey’s if a TV’s posterior is a Vanessa Feltz or a Pippa Middleton, so long as what comes out the front hits the spot. You probably won’t be too surprised from this introduction to hear that LG’s 47LM960V falls foul of our dislike of ‘style over substance’ TVs. Though it must be said that its style is truly exceptional! For despite using direct LED lighting – where the LED array sits behind the screen – rather than edge LED lighting, the 47LM960V delivers a bezel so skinny at under 4mm that you can barely see it, and a rear that sticks out just 38mm. Truly stunning. LG Nano Technology The 47LM960V’s rear depth is barely half that of a typical direct LED TV, and is achieved thanks to LG’s Nano technology, whereby a diffusion sheet is introduced in front of the LED lights so that they need less throw distance to illuminate the screen. However, it seems to us that it’s also this Nano technology that’s chiefly responsible for the feelings of disappointment we’ve felt with the 47LM960V’s picture performance. Here’s the deal. Usually when we test a direct LED TV rather than an edge LED TV, we expect that set...

Does Smart TV Functionality Cause "Burn-in" Effect on LG’s 2012 LED TV’s?

Screen Burn On LED TV? Recently, we received a brand new 47″ LG LM670S LED-backlit LCD TV (Edge LED i.e. LED TV, as marketing brochures say) for a review. While this TV combines the factory default calibrated image with intuitive user interface, the built in operating system obviously requires serious work. To be more precise, after using the Smart TV functionality such as web browsing, we have noticed the appearance of so-called “lazy image” i.e. “burn-in” effect which is characteristic to plasma panels of yesteryear. The appearance of ghosted image is typical for screens based on phosphorus, such as the old CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) or plasma panels. You can even notice the static content remaining unchanged after you change the content, or even after the complete shutdown of the TV. Given the time of curing the phosphorous, it takes some time for the cells to return to their normal position. Plasma panels are still subject to this effect, even though the cell cycles changed, manufacturers embedding different protection elements such as pixel shifting, or special image cleaning patterns.     Naturally, LCD panels are not based on phosphorous. However, they can show traces of previous image which remained on the screen for some time. LCD panels are consisted from tiny crystals positioned in a thin film, showing images by changing its rotating and letting more or less light. If the crystals are continuously exposed to the same amount of current, the crystals can develop a tendency to remain the same position even after the current changes. As a consequence, a new shade of gray will appear – if...

LG 55LM660T TV review

 LG 3D LED TV 55 Inch – LG55LM660T What is it? A 55in edge LED TV from the middle of LG’s passive 3D TV range, with extensive smart TV functionality. What’s great Its design is sensational, its online and multimedia features are very good, and its 2D and 3D pictures are very easy on the eye. What’s not Marginal resolution loss with 3D, high levels of input lag, minor backlight flaws. The bottom line The 55LM660T kicks off LG’s 2012 TV range in bold and mostly triumphant style. LG 55LM660T Review LG has kicked off its second generation of passive 3D TVs in serious style with the LG55LM660T. For starters, the TV’s frame is so thin – barely 1cm – that its huge 55in screen looks as if it’s just hanging in thin air. This is especially true when the TV is off, since then the only bit of frame you’re aware of is the 1mm or so of outer silver trim. Despite looking like a flagship TV, though, the 55LM660T is actually from the middle of LG’s new passive 3D range. But that’s not to say it doesn’t still have plenty of high-end features to its name. For instance, unlike many rival sets that use the active 3D format, the 55LM660T provides free 3D glasses (four pairs, in fact), so you can enjoy its passive 3D pictures as soon as you get it home. The 55LM660T also comes packing plenty of multimedia heat. Attach it to your network via its LAN port or built-in wi-Fi system, and you can either stream in video, photo and music files from...

In love with 3 dimensions: LG unveils new Cinema 3D TV line-up

LG Cinema TV By Claire Reilly It’s been a busy week for televisions this week – following Samsung’s LED TV product launch on Tuesday, LG Electronics Australia unveiled its new range of LG Cinema 3D Smart TVs at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney on Wednesday. LG’s marketing general manager, Lambro Skropidis, used the launch to outline the company’s strategy for flat panels and to reaffirm its focus on 3D technology. “Our challenge in this industry is to keep providing consumers with relevant that enhances their lives in such a way that they see value in higher-priced products,” said Skropidis. “Do we expect demand for 3D to continue? The answer is a resounding, ‘Yes’. 3D has not only arrived, but it is gathering rapid momentum. Confident in 3D Technology “We feel confident that our 3D technology will become an industry standard into the future,” he added. “Consumers are looking to replicate the cinema experience in the home and, increasingly, they’re purchasing larger and larger sizes of screens that bring this immersive 3D viewing experience into the living room.” Skropidis also reiterated the company’s focus on “three consumer-centric pillars” as a means of finding success in the category, namely, “Premium design, unparalleled viewing experiences, and relevant and simplified connectivity.” Click here to sign up for our FREE daily newsletter Follow Current.com.au on Twitter As a part of the launch, guests were invited into the top floor of the MCA to get hands on with the new technology at individual experience stations that showcased the new technological advances of the TV line-up. New Magic Remote Control These included a new...